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The 12 Best Odd Job Apps to Earn Extra Cash

Odd Job Apps
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When people think of gig economy apps, a few big names typically come to mind: Uber for driving, DoorDash for delivery and Upwork for creative and admin services, just to name a few. 

But these aren’t the only ways to leverage the gig economy. There are short-term, freelance and on-demand work opportunities available for handymen, movers, cooks, caretakers, painters and those with many other skill sets. 

In most cases, you can find flexible work in minutes, set your own schedule, and log as many (or as few) hours as you want. 

Here’s a rundown of some of the best gig economy apps for odd jobs. 

The 12 Best Apps for Odd Jobs

#1. TaskRabbit

Types of odd jobs: Handyperson, chores and item delivery.

Getting paid: You invoice your clients and get paid through TaskRabbit’s secure payment system.

TaskRabbit is one of the largest platforms on the web for finding and getting paid for handyperson and chore-type gigs. Some common jobs on the platform include (but aren’t limited to):

  • Cleaning
  • Furniture assembly
  • Moving heavy objects
  • Picking up items from a store
  • Yardwork

TaskRabbit operates like a freelance marketplace. After filling out a profile containing details about yourself, your services, rates and availability (you set your own schedule), clients reach out to you when they need your help.

Given the wide range of tasks, TaskRabbit offers a variety of work that can help keep your odd job pursuits feeling fresh.

#2. Fiverr

Types of odd jobs: You can monetize almost any skill or knowledge on Fiverr.

Getting paid: You set your own prices. Clients pay Fiverr, and the funds are released upon completion of the agreed-upon services. 

Fiverr is a freelance marketplace where you can offer a variety of productized services. The platform caters to freelancers doing odd jobs in creative fields such as graphics and audio, as well as programming, tech and digital marketing. Editing, logo design, social media management, app development and virtual assisting are some common gigs Fiverr workers offer clients.

Check out our beginner’s guide to Fiverr to learn more about how to maximize your earnings and succeed on the platform.

#3. Pared

Types of odd jobs: Restaurants and food service.

Getting paid: Once you get paid for completing a gig, you can cash out via direct deposit or a debit card.

Pared is an app that connects chefs, dishwashers, line cooks, waiters and other food service professionals with short-term work at restaurants, bars and cafes that are short-staffed. Restaurants sometimes look for long-term workers on the platform, and may hire you as full-time staff if you do well.

Pared
Pared shows you exactly what job is available, where it is, and how much it pays.

Instead of going through the job application and scheduling process, Pared works like Uber. You open the app (or wait for a push notification), look for offers, and accept those that sound appealing. Plus, there’s a content and discussion section in the app where you can talk shop with other people and possibly find more jobs.

Overall, Pared can be a great place for experienced food service workers to pick up extra work and even learn new skills if they want to. 

Check out this New York Times article to learn more about what working on Pared looks like.

#4. Thumbtack

Types of odd jobs: Both odd jobs and professional services in various industries.

Getting paid: You set your own rates and work out payment directly with the client. 

Thumbtack has odd jobs that don’t require many qualifications, such as helping people move. However, much of the work available is professional services — everything from plumbing to tax preparation to wedding photography and more. 

This app offers plenty of flexibility in the jobs you do, yet also makes sure you get a steady client flow with as little work as possible. 

After you create a profile, you tell Thumbtack what kinds of jobs you want, and it’ll only show your profile to potential clients looking for that particular kind of work. 

Interestingly, clients can only contact up to five people at a time for a job, limiting your competition and helping you charge higher rates. Thumbtack even sends you emails telling you how you stack up against competitors in your area.

#5. Jobble

Types of odd jobs: A variety of job types — mostly temporary, but some part-time and full-time work is available.

Getting paid: You get paid via direct deposit or debit card.

Jobble helps you find all sorts of odd jobs, as well as part-time and full-time jobs if you’re ever interested. That said, most of the opportunities on Jobble are temporary gigs, such as seasonal and event-based jobs.

Jobble is essentially a job board: after you create a profile, you can search the platform and apply for work. The app also offers plenty of perks in the form of free stuff and deals. For example, they offer two weeks of Skillshare classes for free. (Skillshare only offers one week on its own.)

#6. Bellhop

Types of odd jobs: Moving.

Getting paid: Base pay based on mileage, plus tips and bonuses. You get paid weekly via direct deposit.

Bellhop is an odd job app that lets people book moving services with little hassle. As a Bellhop mover, you get a lot of flexibility. You get to set your schedule and can update your availability at any time. You can wait for Bellhop to match you with gigs, or you can go accept open jobs yourself.

Bellhop
Bellhop offers decent pay plus plenty of scheduling flexibility.

You can also excuse yourself from a job if you need to with 24 hours notice, making it easy to schedule jobs around your life.

Now, you will need reliable transportation because you have to drive to each client’s location. (Bellhop provides the moving truck.)

Speaking of driving, you can step up to be a moving truck driver and earn even more. You can use your own truck instead of Bellhop’s if you want, but it’s not recommended.

You must be capable of lifting 100 pounds to work for Bellhop.

Check out this New York Times article about Bellhop to learn more.

#7. Dolly

Types of odd jobs: Moving, furniture delivery.

Getting paid: $15 to $30 per hour depending on whether you have a truck or van. You’ll get paid every Friday via PayPal.

Dolly is an app centered around furniture delivery gigs, although there is a moderate number of jobs involving moving assistance and transporting items to storage units. 

The app makes it easy to fit in work around your life. Like some ride-sharing and delivery apps, you get to pick any gigs that fit your schedule and abilities.

#8. Fancy Hands

Types of odd jobs: Virtual assisting.

Getting paid: $3 to $7 per task to start (with opportunities for advancement). You’re paid every other Tuesday.

Fancy Hands offers a variety of virtual assistant work. You can’t just sign up, though — you have to apply and be accepted onto the platform. If accepted, here are some tasks you might do for the company’s clients:

  • Data entry
  • Making phone calls
  • Researching and buying products
  • Searching for travel accommodations that match the client’s criteria
  • Scheduling appointments

Like with many odd job apps, Fancy Hands is flexible. You get to set your own hours, and since it’s virtual assisting, you can work from anywhere. 

What’s interesting is that Fancy Hands says there’s room for growth. The company doesn’t explain much what that means, but they do say that your earnings can increase as you continue to do well as a virtual assistant on the platform.

Check out our beginner’s guide to virtual assistant training to learn more about the skills you need to be successful in the field.

#9. Handy

Types of odd jobs: House cleaning, handyperson and lawn care.

Getting paid: Pay occurs on a per-job basis, but Handy claims you can earn $20+ per hour for cleaning jobs, $40+ per hour for handyperson tasks and $60+ per house for lawn care. You get paid via direct deposit “soon after the job is complete,” per Handy’s website.

As the name implies, Handy provides plenty of handyperson work. You can also offer cleaning and lawn care services (the latter has the highest potential pay). Some tasks you can expect to see on Handy include:

  • Furniture assembly
  • Home maintenance/repairs
  • Home/office/vacation rental cleaning
  • Remodeling projects
  • TV mounting
  • Wall hanging

On Handy, you get to set your hours, making it easy to work gigs around the rest of your schedule. After you make a profile, clients come to you, making it even easier to fit these jobs into your daily life.

Handy requires you to have paid experience in whatever service you’re offering. You can make good money on this platform if you have experience doing these types of projects — but if you’re just looking for quick and easy odd jobs, another app may be better.

#10. Lugg

Types of odd jobs: Furniture delivery, moving.

Getting paid: Base fee plus tips. You get paid at the end of each day via direct deposit.

Lugg offers gig workers moving jobs. The company bills itself as “the Instacart of furniture,” although furniture isn’t the only thing you’ll move.

On Lugg, you might help transport large items customers purchased from stores or on Craigslist, as well as donations and junk clients are throwing out. Sometimes, you might help clients put things into storage, or even move to new homes.

As a Lugg worker, you get to set your own schedule. You can join either as a helper (where you merely help lift and load items) or as a driver if you have a truck. Both types of workers can earn tips.

Unlike many odd job apps, Lugg pays every single day. This makes it a great app if you need cash fast; just do a few jobs one day and the money will be in your account as fast as your bank processes it.

Check out this article to learn more about Lugg.

#11. Care.com

Types of odd jobs: Caregiving, housekeeping and pet care.

Getting paid: You set your rates, then clients pay you through the platform.

Care.com offers caregivers a platform to find several kinds of work online. You don’t need any special qualifications to sign up, but you may need some to take certain jobs. 

The types of caregiving work you can find on Care.com include:

  • Childcare
  • Housekeeping
  • Pet care
  • Private lessons/instruction
  • Senior care
  • School support and tutoring
  • Special needs care

Care.com also has a few people looking for odd jobs or errands, but caregiving work represents the majority of opportunities by far.

Like some other marketplaces, clients come to you through direct messages on the platform. However, getting hired can be a more arduous process than on some other sites, given the nature of the work. Clients will usually interview you before giving you a job to make sure you’re the right person.

#12. Wonolo

Types of odd jobs: Everything from administrative work to cleaning to event staffing and more.

Getting paid: Pay depends on the job and company. You’ll get paid via direct deposit or debit card within one to five days of completing a job.

Wonolo is a temp staffing agency that helps businesses find short-term workers for a variety of needs. As a worker, you set your own hours, and you can sift through Wonolo’s extensive range of job postings until you find one you like and are qualified for.

Here’s a video testimonial from a Wonolo user:

Apps like Wonolo are a great way to get paid to learn new industries. In some cases, you may gain new skills and experience relevant to your current career (a great resume booster).

That said, some Wonolo clients are looking for employees instead of (or in addition to) contractors. You might be able to land a totally new job — and even change careers — through Wonolo if you want.

Other Types of Gig Economy Jobs

The opportunities in this section don’t quite fit the normal definition of “odd jobs,” but they can still be great ways to make money in the gig economy.

You can click on the links below to jump to our guide about each opportunity. 

  • Food Delivery: Companies like DoorDash and GrubHub pay you to deliver orders from various restaurants. The payment structures differ between companies, but you generally earn a base fee plus tips (either in cash or through the app).
  • Freelancing: Freelancing involves offering a professional skill to others, but as a self-employed person instead of an employee. Common freelancing jobs include bookkeeping, editing, graphic design, programming and writing.
  • Market Research: You can get paid to give your opinion on all sorts of topics by taking surveys. Tons of websites offer these. Brands generally use your answers to inform their product development and marketing campaign creation. Longer and more niche surveys pay larger amounts.
  • Online Tutoring: Several websites pay you to tutor students in middle school, high school and college over the internet. Many of these jobs pay well but may require a bachelor’s degree (although that degree can usually be in any field of study).
  • Virtual Assistant: Virtual assistants are essentially administrative assistants that work remotely. They do a range of admin-type tasks, such as answering phone calls, data entry, email management, proofreading and scheduling. 

These are just a few examples of work you can do in the gig economy. There truly is something for anyone seeking an extra income stream. Picking one might be a challenge, though. Check out our list of side hustle ideas to learn a bit more about some of the best gigs you can do in your spare time.

The Best Odd Job Apps: Final Thoughts

These days, many people seek to create a long-term online income stream by building a business or committing to an online job. But that’s not your only option. 

Thanks to odd job apps and websites, you can pick up quick gigs here and there and start earning as early as today, with no need to learn new skills or commit long-term to any particular endeavor.

R.J. Weiss
R.J. Weiss is the founder and editor of The Ways To Wealth, a Certified Financial Planner™, husband and father of three. He's spent the last 10+ years writing about personal finance and has been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg, MSN Money, and other publications.

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