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15 Online Proofreading Jobs You Can Do From Home [2022]

Online Proofreading Jobs
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Finding online proofreading jobs that pay well is a challenge even for experienced proofreaders.

Mixed in with the handful of sites and platforms where skilled proofreaders are paid well, you’ll also find dozens of sites that pay close to minimum wage.

We compiled this list of the best online proofreading jobs to help you find the options that are actually worth your time, ranked based on factors like reputation, demand for proofreaders and earning potential.

If you’re interested in learning about getting started in the field, see our in-depth article on how to become a proofreader.

The Best Online Proofreading Jobs

#1. Fiverr

If you’re looking for freelance proofreading jobs, Fiverr is a great place to start your search. 

Fiverr is a freelance marketplace that allows you to set your own rates, create your own jobs, and build up your expertise. It can be competitive, and the pay can be hit and miss, but it’s a solid way to build up your freelance portfolio.

Because it’s a freelance site, you can make money at your own speed and on your own schedule — which is a huge perk for those wanting to do a side hustle around a full-time job or parenting schedule.

You can learn more about how the platform works in our ultimate guide on how to make money on Fiverr.

#2. Upwork

Upwork is another gig economy marketplace where you can find freelance proofreading jobs. Unlike Fiverr, it places a larger emphasis on long-term jobs and ongoing contracts.

It can be difficult to get started on the platform because the competition is fierce, but it’s a great next step in your journey once you have some proofreading experience under your belt.

That’s especially true because the pay is often significantly higher than on Fiverr.

Learn how to compete on the platform in our guide on how to get your first job on Upwork.

#3. FlexJobs

FlexJobs is a good option if you’re looking for a steady remote proofreading job rather than a freelance position. It’s an online job board dedicated to remote and work-from-home positions, and every job listed on the site has been manually checked to ensure it’s a legit opportunity.

The big downside to FlexJobs is that it does have a monthly membership fee of about $15 — though we think the vetting done by the site, combined with its extensive filtering and search options, make it worth the cost (at least on a short-term basis while you’re job hunting).

If you’re interested in signing up, use the code WEALTH at checkout to get 30% off your membership.

You can also learn more about the site and how it works in our in-depth FlexJobs review.

#4. WordsRU

WordsRU offers professional proofreading services to writers of all backgrounds, from novelists to students to businesspeople.

For those with a master’s degree, Ph.D. or equivalent experience (and some prior proofreading experience), WordsRU is a great place to become a full-time professional proofreader. 

By serving such a wide variety of clients, you’ll be able to build a varied portfolio quickly. That said, this isn’t a good site for a beginner proofreader because they’re looking for people with a fairly high level of skill. But if you have the right degree and/or experience, it offers significant earning potential.

#5. Scribbr

Scribbr is a professional editing service that caters exclusively to students. The company offers academic editing of dissertations, helps with APA references, and helps students avoid plagiarism.

Unlike WordsRU, Scribbr uses a large network of freelance editors to serve their clients. Not only this, they provide academic editing in numerous languages, giving you a chance to utilize any additional language expertise you have.

Check their job postings regularly, as their needs constantly change.

Note that this is largely a copyediting service, not strictly a proofreading service. As such, it’s best suited for those with editing skill in addition to proofreading acumen.

#6. Wordvice

Wordvice is a one-stop shop for writers, offering proofreading services for manuscripts, dissertations, business documents and everything in between. Like WordsRU, this can be a great way to build a diverse portfolio that allows you to step into a more niche role elsewhere.

If you’re a native English speaker with a graduate degree and two years of editing experience, Wordvice can be a great place to continue your proofreading path once you have some experience.

As with Scribb, Wordvice’s remote proofreading jobs are best suited for those with copyediting skill.

#7. ProofreadingServices.com

ProofreadingServices.com offers general proofreading services to businesses and individuals alike, as well as resume writing.

The requirements to work at ProofreadingServices.com aren’t as strict as some of the other sites on this list. So, if you’ve gotten a bit of experience on Fiverr or Upwork and you’re ready to take the next step, consider applying at the ProofreadingServices.com site.

#8. Gramlee

Gramlee is a unique proofreading service that promises a 24-hour turnaround time to writers. Gramlee isn’t limited to one type of writing either, promising a polished paper to anyone who submits their work.

If you’re a fast editor and even faster learner who’s comfortable tackling a wide variety of subject matter, apply to proofread for Gramlee.

#9. EditFast

EditFast is a no-nonsense proofreading and editing site for all kinds of writing.

They allow writers to submit their work and pick their own editor, or let EditFast pick an editor for them. Much like Gramlee, EditFast entails editing a wide variety of writing, so a sense of adventure is a must.

If you have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university and you’re prepared to edit nearly anything, apply at EditFast.

#10. Kibin

Kibin, much like Scribbr, only edits academic pieces, focusing primarily on essays.

Unlike many proofreading services available, Kibin promises students they’ll go beyond standard edits and offer useful feedback that helps them create a thoughtful, effective piece.

As of now, Kiblin is looking for editors outside the U.S. and Canada with overnight availability. Check their employment page to learn more.

#11. Proofreading Pal

Proofreading Pal provides editing services for bloggers, those writing academic papers, novelists and beyond.

They allow writers to select an editing turnaround time of anywhere from 30 minutes to seven days, which can make tasks more lax or intense depending on their choice. They also utilize two editors per piece, so you’ll learn to co-edit with another person.

For current students or those employed at a university, or those with a graduate degree and experience in proofreading, Proofreading Pal can provide a steady stream of proofreading work at home.

#12. Scribendi

Scribendi is a well-known and respected name in the proofreading industry, with more than 400 editors.

The company offers a number of editing services, including academic papers, English as a second language editing, manuscript edits and more. This makes it a great spot to either specialize or get a wide variety of experience and see what interests you.

Their editing jobs range from beginner to senior, requiring various backgrounds and experience. Keep an eye on their regularly changing job postings and see if the right one for you shows up.

#13. Braintrust

Braintrust is a freelance marketplace similar to Upwork but with a much more freelancer-friendly business model. While they don’t have as many opportunities as Upwork, the fact that freelancers are able to keep 100% of what they earn makes it a great option for those just starting out.

Another benefit is that because the platform is new yet growing fast — both in terms of companies hiring and freelancers offering their services — it’s easier to establish yourself as a top freelance proofreader on the network.

#14. Scribe Media

Scribe Media is the company behind many best-selling non-fiction books, most famously David Goggins’ Can’t Hurt Me (which has now sold millions of copies).

Formally called Book-In-A-Box, it offers a done-for-you book publishing service that goes from drafting an outline to writing the book and, ultimately, to marketing the book.

They’re currently hiring and have consistent openings for a freelance remote Quality Assurance Editor that pays $35 per hour. No formal experience is required.

See the Scribe Media careers page for more information

#15. Various Online Job Boards

Lastly, check around various job boards. Indeed, Craigslist and many others can have proofreading jobs requiring little to no experience.

Make sure you investigate the company posting on a job board to determine if the job is legit, especially when utilizing Craigslist.

Google the company or individual, see if there are any complaints on them running a scam, and proceed with caution. Not all jobs on job boards will be fraudulent, but it’s something to be mindful of.

Skills Needed for Online Proofreading Jobs

Online proofreading jobs can have varying levels of requirements. An entry-level proofreading job, for example, will require far less experience than a senior proofreading position. Similarly, some of the jobs in the list above are both remote proofreading and editing jobs, which means you’ll need to be able to not only check text for errors, but also make structural changes when necessary. 

That being said, many jobs require the same proofreading skills as a baseline. Here’s what we consider to be the most important skills when you’re applying for a remote proofreading job.

  • English proficiency: If you plan on editing for English publications or writers, you’ll need a solid understanding of the language itself. The same applies for any additional languages you want to proofread for.
  • Eye for detail: One of your primary tasks as a proofreader is catching typos or grammatical errors and ensuring work is error-free. This requires a high attention to detail. If you’re one to catch mistakes in others’ work, you could possibly be a great proofreader with some practice.
  • Familiar with tech: Many online proofreader jobs require that you edit within certain programs, so being comfortable with learning new tech is essential. This is especially true for freelancers, where you’ll switch clients a lot and could find yourself hopping from platform to platform.
  • Self-starter: When you’re proofreading, especially in a remote setting, you’re largely left to your own devices. You need to be able to motivate yourself to knock out projects on your own.

If you’re new to proofreading and wondering where to start, Proofread Anywhere is a great resource to learn the basics and then some.

Founded by Caitlin Pyle — who made more than $40,000 a year proofreading part-time — Proofread Anywhere is an excellent resource that can help you learn the ins and outs of proofreading, prep for any proofreading tests you may encounter, and find a great proofreading job.

To learn more, check out her free introductory workshop: Learn the Skills You Need to Start Your Freelance Proofreading Hustle.

Proofread Anywhere
Learn How to Become a Proofreader

Learn How to Become a Proofreader

Proofread Anywhere is the go-to resource for people looking to break into the work-from-home proofreading industry. The free 76-minute workshop explains how to know whether proofreading is a good fit for you, and how to get started if you decide that it is.

Proofreading Jobs FAQ

Where can you get proofreading training at home?

We recommend Proofread Anywhere from long-time proofreader Caitlin Pyle. Caitlin offers an excellent online course, free intro workshop and e-books that can teach you the basics of proofreading and help you find online proofreading jobs.

How do you become a freelance proofreader?

To start freelance proofreading, you’ll want to build up your skills and portfolio. First, secure as many jobs as possible on sites like Fiverr — where you can easily build a profile proofreading short articles and essays. With some experience under your belt, apply for higher-paying jobs that require some experience, leveling up as often as you can. For more information, see our guide on how to start freelancing.

What is the average salary for a proofreader?

According to the BLS, the average full-time salary of a proofreader is $ 41,140, with the median hourly wage of $19.78 per hour.

How much money does a proofreader make?

While the average is $19.78 per hour, know that some proofreaders make much more, while some make less. To become a top-earning proofreader, it’s best to establish yourself as a leader in a niche. You can also add on skills to your ability to proofread, such as SEO, which will bring more value to your client.

What qualifications do you need to be a proofreader?

As a beginner proofreader — especially when targeting proofreading jobs online — no specific qualifications are needed. With the right strategy, you can secure remote proofreading jobs on platforms like Upwork and Fiverr without experience. Experience and formal education tends to come into play more when applying to full-time proofreading jobs at larger companies.

What startup costs are required to become a proofreader?

Proofreading is one of the most affordable businesses to start. Many companies work within Google Docs, which you can access for free. A Grammarly subscription can also help sharpen your skills but is optional.

The Best Online Proofreading Job Sites: Final Thoughts

Proofreading can be a great way to earn a living from home or even on the move. Whether you’re wanting to proofread full-time or simply do it as a side hustle, there are a number of options that can suit all experience levels.

Take advantage of the fluid nature of freelance and test out various industries. If you’re not taking to online proofreading jobs, consider trying your hand at blogging or any other number of online jobs

There are more opportunities at your fingertips than you could ever count. In time, you’ll find the perfect fit.

R.J. Weiss
R.J. Weiss is the founder and editor of The Ways To Wealth, a Certified Financial Planner™, husband and father of three. He's spent the last 10+ years writing about personal finance and has been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg, MSN Money, and other publications.

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