We’ve all had a time or two in our lives when we needed money fast. A quick influx of cash — even just $50 — can help put food on the table, pay the utility bills, or provide some extra spending money.

In situations like this, you want to start working immediately and get paid as soon as possible. Unfortunately, getting paid quickly isn’t always the norm in the online job space. Some companies make you wait 30 or even 90 days before cash hits your bank account.

That’s why I put together this list of legit online jobs that pay weekly. Here, you’ll find both part-time and full-time work-at-home jobs that you can start today and have cash in your bank account in seven days or less once the work is complete.

How to Choose the Right Online Job

Figuring out which of these legit work-from-home jobs is best in your particular situation requires careful consideration, because there’s no dead-set best job — each has its own list of pros and cons that you need to think about.  

Only you can determine which job you should pursue. Here are some questions to help you narrow down your search.

  • Enjoyment level: Do you like the work involved?
  • Skill level/experience: Do you have any experience that can help you get your foot in the door?
  • Expected hourly pay: What can you expect to earn, and do you feel that’s a fair price for your time?
  • Short-term potential: How quickly can you start making money, and are there any requirements to get started (such as a background check or interview process)?
  • Long-term potential: Can you grow within this field, and will you make a higher income over time?
  • Flexibility: Will this job fit well with the rest of your life? For example, do the hours work with your schedule, considering both your regular job and/or family obligations?

Micro Task Sites vs. Freelancing

While there’s no shortage of legit online jobs out there, you’ll find that most of the ones that pay weekly fall into two broad categories.

  • Micro task or micro job sites: These sites offer jobs that are highly specific and/or task oriented. They include things like online tutoring, transcription, and website user testing.
  • Freelancing: This covers a wide variety of jobs, such as writing, proofreading, editing, graphic design, and more. The big difference here is that you’re going out and acquiring clients instead of having them provided to you by a company (as is the case with micro task work).

Here’s a look at the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

Micro Task or Micro Job Sites

This includes sites that allow you to do a specific task or job. For example, the website TranscribeMe specializes in online transcription services.

  • Pros:
    • You can start right away, as the work is waiting for you.
    • There’s a lot of opportunity if you have the time to invest.
    • You can build a new skill.
  • Cons:
    • Low starting pay.
    • Some sites have background checks and an interview process (which takes time).
    • Limited long-term growth potential.

Entry-Level Freelance Jobs

Freelancing is an opportunity available to both skilled professionals and entry-level workers. Examples of entry-level freelance jobs include data research, graphic design, and writing.

You can begin to charge more for your services after you’ve built up a portfolio. Or, if you want, you can move on to a higher paying niche inside your specialty. For example, if you do web research, you can move on to researching and pulling data from financial reports, which is typically a higher paying and more skilled niche within web research.

  • Pros:
    • Long-term growth potential as you add skills.
    • Opportunity for advancement and higher income.
    • No shortage of websites to find clients.
  • Cons:
    • It may take time to get up and running, as you’ll be competing with a lot of other entry-level workers.

If you’re interested in learning more about freelance writing, check out my guide:
Freelance Writing Jobs for Beginners: 3 Steps To Earning Your First High-Paying Client

The Best Micro Jobs That Pay Weekly

When it comes to micro jobs, there are both broad and niche-specific sites. Examples of broad sites include Fiverr, which allows anyone to submit any task to be completed for $5. Tasks range from doing a voiceover to data entry to graphic design — and almost everything in between.

Then there are niche-specific sites like TranscribeMe, which specializes in only transcription jobs.

Here are the best sites, both broad and niche-specific, to get started making money online.

#1 — Fiverr

Quick summary: On Fiverr, customers search for the services they need, review pre-priced offers from sellers (which are called gigs), and place their payment in escrow until the work is complete.

As there are literally hundreds of different micro jobs you can do online, checking out the tasks available on a general site like Fiverr is a great place to start.

The best route to go to earn your first gig is to choose a highly-specialized task that uniquely matches your skillset. For example, one top seller specializes in just French Canadian voice overs, while another specializes in voice work with an Australian accent.

You’ll probably be surprised by the array of skills you can monetize on the site. I’ve seen gigs from successful sellers offering services with titles like “I will draw a black and white sketch of anything you want,” and “I will help you find good domain names for your business.”

To get some ideas, spend some time on the site seeing what people are willing to pay for, then go out and create three to five gigs of your own.

Expected hourly pay: $15+

Pros:

  • Hundreds of different options for getting started.
  • While you’re likely to earn just $5 per task at the beginning, you can develop relationships with buyers that turn into higher-paying and/or more consistent work.
  • You’ll gain experience to help identify different market opportunities.
  • $5 is just the minimum price for a gig. You can charge any amount you want, although you’ll probably have to keep your rates relatively low while you’re getting established on the site.

Cons:

  • It can take time to build up your profile and get a consistent stream of offers.
  • Fiverr is strict about seller performance, including compliance with deadlines, feedback and response rate. For example, you’re required to reply to every message you receive within 24 hours. Failing to do so negatively affects your metrics, which means you’ll rank lower in the site’s search results (and get fewer jobs).
  • Fiverr takes a 20% commission, so you’ll need to take that into account when setting your pricing.

Pay cycle: 14 days from project completion, or seven days for Top Rated sellers. (You need to have lifetime earnings of at least $20,000 to hit Top Rated status). You can cash out your earnings to PayPal, via direct deposit to your bank account, or through a Payoneer debit card.

Fiverr is one of the most common ways beginners make money online, so it deserves a spot on this list. Just know that it does take 14 days for funds to clear for new sellers.

Other sites to check out:

#2 — Online Tutoring

Quick summary: If you’re interested in tutoring students from the comfort of your own home, there are now dozens of sites that connect you with willing learners all over the world. Subjects can vary depending on experience and/or educational background.

Expected hourly pay: Between $15 and $25, on average

Pros:

  • A very fulfilling way to earn money by making a difference in children’s lives.
  • Pay is on the higher side, even for beginners.
  • Work is very consistent, as most sites have a strong demand for good teachers.
  • Most sites provide the curriculum for you, so you can focus on teaching.

Cons:

  • Takes one to two weeks to sign up, interview, and go through the proper training.
  • Different sites have different requirements, but most require a bachelor’s degree (or that you’re working towards one).
  • If working with overseas students, you’ll have to adjust your schedule to their time zone.

Best site to start: The online tutoring site Chegg is one of the few that pays weekly. With Chegg, you’ll be teaching primarily U.S.-based high-school and college students in a variety of subjects. A test is required to show that you clearly understand a subject before you can start to teach.

Pay cycle: Pays every Thursday.

Other sites to check out:

See Also: The Best Websites To Find Online Tutoring Jobs

#3 — Rate and Review Websites

Quick summary: Sites like UserTesting.com allow you to earn extra cash by providing feedback on websites. This involves visiting a website, performing a few simple tasks, and recording your thoughts via video or audio. You’re paid $10 per 20-minutes of uploaded feedback.

Expected hourly pay: $15+

Pros:

  • Decent earnings for entry-level work.
  • Can get started quickly, as all that’s required is a sample test.

Cons:

  • There isn’t always work available.

Best site to start: UserTesting.com

Pay cycle: Paid via PayPal seven days after a test is complete.

Other sites to check out:

#4 — Transcription

Quick summary: Transcription involves transforming audio and video recordings into text. While there are multiple micro job sites that offer general transcription work, if you’re looking to make money fast check out TranscribeMe, which allows you to request payment once your work is approved (which usually takes about three days).

Expected hourly pay: $5+

Pros:

  • Good demand right now for transcriptionists, thanks to growth of both podcasts and video content.
  • Set your own hours.
  • Work requires little to no experience to get started.
  • Because you’re typically compensated on a per-project basis, the faster you transcribe the more you can make.

Cons:

  • Earnings are on the lower side.
  • Many transcriptionists use special software. The most popular is Express Scribe, which costs about $80. Serious transcriptionists pair Express Scribe with a foot pedal ($50 on Amazon) which allows them to control playback (i.e., start and stop the track) without taking their hands off the keyboard.
  • There’s limited upside in general transcription. The legal and medical fields are two areas where there is room for growth.

Pay cycle: Can request pay daily, after work is approved.

Other sites to check out:

#5 — Online Writing Jobs

Quick summary: Micro job sites like Textbroker allow you to make extra money by completing writing assignments. Unlike transcription, where the work is repetitive and simple, writing is very expensive and skilled writers are in high demand. There are also writing niches, such as copywriting, that pay very well. As such, it’s best to view a site like Textbroker as a way to gain experience and make money fast. Over the long-term, it’s best to work with clients one on one.

Expected hourly pay: $5+

Pros:

  • Freelance writing is in high demand. You can gain experience on a site like TextBroker and then use that experience to attract better-paying clients.

Cons:

  • Only available to U.S. citizens.
  • Must complete a writing sample before being allowed to work on Textbroker.
  • Pay maxes out around 5 cents per word.

Pay cycle: Can request payment via PayPal once your account balance reaches $10.

Other sites to check out:

If freelance writing sounds like something you’d like to try, check out six-figure freelancer and award-winning personal finance writer Holly Johnson’s free workshop: How to Build a Six-Figure Writing Career.

Earn More Writing

#6 — Translation

Quick summary: If you’re bilingual, micro job sites like LanguageLine allow you to translate audio and text, both live and recorded, to make money.

Expected hourly pay: $12.50+

Pros:

  • Decent pay at $12.50 per hour.
  • May be relatively easy work if you’re fluent in an in-demand language.
  • Opportunity to earn more as you gain experience and increase your efficiency.

Cons:

  • The hiring process can be long as an interview and proficiency test is required.

Pay cycle: Weekly by direct deposit or check.

Other sites to check out:

#7 — Appointment Setting

Quick summary: If you have the ability to make phone calls that book appointments, there’s a great opportunity to make money. A popular appointment setting company is Blue Zebra, which operates more as a part-time job where you work a set amount of hours per week cold calling prospects.

Expected hourly pay: $15

Pros:

  • If a sales professional finds someone that can book appointments, they’ll happily keep paying for their services.
  • Opportunity to earn bonuses the better you perform.

Cons:

  • The work isn’t the most enjoyable, as you’ll face a lot of rejection.
  • Not as flexible as other jobs, because you’re required to work a minimum number of hours per week.

Pay cycle: Paid weekly via direct deposit.

#8 — Data Entry

Quick summary: Amazon MTurk is another general micro job site that allows requesters to post HITs (human intelligence tasks) for users to perform. While it offers all types of work, one of the most popular is data entry, where you can make money online uploading data to a computer.

Expected hourly pay: $5

Pros:

  • No experience, interview or application process is required.
  • Similar to Fiverr, there are an array of jobs on the platform.
  • More opportunities open up as you complete more HITs.
  • The work is extremely flexible.

Cons:

  • There’s very limited upside in data entry.
  • The requester has the right to refuse your work, and therefore deny you compensation if your work contains errors.

Pay cycle: Pays weekly through direct deposit for U.S. workers. Non-U.S. workers can get paid in Amazon gift cards.

Other sites to check out:

#9 — Slice the Pie

Quick summary: If you love listening to new music, check out the site Slice The Pie. You’ll listen to a song for 90 seconds, then rate it on a basis of 1 to 10 (plus write a short review). As you might guess, the money isn’t great. But if you’re looking to make money from a hobby, this is a chance to make a few extra bucks.

Expected hourly pay: < $5

Pros:

  • Fun, enjoyable work for music fans.
  • There’s a lot of supply, so you can jump right in and start earning.

Cons:

  • You’ll start at Bronze level, which only pays about 6 cents per review.
  • Gold level pays 15 cents per review, so earnings are capped at around $5 an hour.

Pay cycle: Pays on both Tuesday and Fridays, with a $10 minimum payout.

Other sites to check out:

With freelancing, you can work from anywhere and get paid weekly

Entry-Level Freelance Jobs

The biggest difference between freelancing and micro job sites is that with freelancing, you’re going out and acquiring clients as an independent contractor.

That means the work isn’t waiting for you. You have to go out and find it.

The good news is that there’s a lot more potential for earning money. It’s possible to freelance full time and make a nice living.

If you’re just starting out in freelancing and not sure what to offer, here are four good skills to start with.

All the jobs listed here are very popular on sites like Upwork and Freelancer, which are marketplaces for freelancers to search for positions with businesses and entrepreneurs around the world.

#1 — Proofreading

Quick summary: Proofreading is a freelance job with steady demand as the growth of online content isn’t slowing down. As a proofreader, you’ll be checking others’ work for grammar and punctuation errors. There is some room for growth, such as going from a proofreader to an editor of books or blogs (where you’ll have more say in what gets published).

Expected hourly pay: $10+ to start

Pros:

  • Can pay a decent rate with a few months of experience ($20+ an hour).
  • Higher-paying niches within the field.
  • Easy to get started, as no skills or credentials are necessary.
  • Most clients produce content continually, so there’s an opportunity for steady income.

Cons:

  • As the skill is very generalized, it can be difficult to earn your first client.

If you’re interested, read my guide on how to become a proofreader and make $45+ per hour from home, and check out Caitlyn Pyle’s free proofreading training webinar. These two resources will give you all the details you need to get started. 

#2 — Freelance Writing

Quick summary: While micro job sites like Textbroker have a lot of opportunity for writing assignments, the pay is low. To make good money as a freelance writer, you’ll eventually want to go out and acquire your own clients. In that sense, Textbroker only makes sense if you’re looking to gain experience or really need to make a quick buck.

What’s to like about freelance writing is that it’s a field where, in a year’s time and by choosing the right niche, you can be making a very good living.

Expected hourly pay: $10+ to start, with significant upside

Pros:

  • There’s strong demand right now for quality freelance writers.
  • You’ll get to learn new things.

Cons:

  • For entry-level freelancers, work can be hard to come by at first.

I’ve worked as a freelance writer multiple times during my career, and I wrote a guide titled Freelance Writing Jobs for Beginners to help others get started.

You should also check out Holly Johnson’s free webinar How to Build a Six Figure Writing Career. She’s a professional blogger and columnist who has great advice about not only how to get started, but also how to scale up and make more money from your writing. 

#3 — Web Research

Quick summary: Web research is an option for making money both on general micro job sites and as a freelancer. The work is best suited for those who love to dig up data. An example of a job I just hired for was finding the number of app reviews, BBB rating, TrustPilot rating, etc., for 50+ online survey companies.

Other types of jobs in this space include competition research, fact checking, gathering email addresses, and so on. If this type of work sounds interesting to you, check out Upwork for web research gigs.

Expected hourly pay: $10 an hour to start

Pros:

  • A lot of work available.
  • Opportunities to make more money as you build a reputation.
  • Can get paid to take a deep dive into interesting topics.

Cons:

  • Even in higher-paying niches, there’s limited upside in earnings.
  • As the skill is very basic, you’ll face tons of competition.

#4 — Virtual Assistant

Quick summary: Virtual assistant is a catch-all term for a remote administrative support associate. You can get started working as an independent contractor for a company like Virtual Office VA, find clients locally via Craigslist or Indeed, or find gigs on Upwork. The work itself will vary based on your client’s needs, but you should expect to do anything from posting on social media, to managing email or customer service requests, to editing.

Expected hourly pay: $10 to start with good potential

Pros:

  • Steady work on a daily basis.
  • Potential to earn a higher income once you learn new skills and develop experience.

Cons:

  • Not as flexible as other jobs, as some employers require you to maintain office hours.

Free Resource: Gina Horkey 150 VA Services you can offer

See Also: 7 Websites to Find Virtual Assistant Jobs When You Have Little to No Experience

#5 — Call Center and Call Reviewing

Quick summary: Two popular work-at-home opportunities are taking inbound customer service calls and reviewing customer service calls for quality. Humanatic is one company that is currently hiring for call reviewing.

But before you go apply, I would recommend checking out a site like FlexJobs to see if there are any similar remote positions available working directly for a company. (Note: FlexJobs is a paid membership site, but you can save 30% by using the promo code WEALTH during checkout.)

My research showed that pay rates for call work tends to be low. So spend some time trying to find a job directly with a company; getting hired as a W2 employee means you’ll at least be subject to minimum wage standards.

Expected hourly pay: $5 on average

Pros:

  • Humanatic is open to hiring call reviewers worldwide.
  • Little training is necessary to get started.
  • Flexible hours.

Cons:

  • Low pay with minimum to no upside.

Pay cycle: Pays on a weekly basis via PayPal.

Other sites to check out: